Disenfranchisement in the Era of Mass Incarceration

In light of the upcoming election, I think it’s important to talk a bit about the connection between disenfranchisement and mass incarceration in the United States. Since watching the 2016 Netflix documentary called 13th and reading Michelle Alexander’s fifth chapter from her book The New Jim Crow, I’ve been thinking a lot about the ways mass incarceration will affect the results of the election in just a few days. Here are a few things that I never knew about mass incarceration and felony disenfranchisement that I believe are important to share with you: Although the United States holds only 5% … Read more

Offensive Graffiti at Our College

I learned last week that we had an incident at our school with someone writing an anti-Semitic and sexist comment in one of our dorms.  I had a conversation with the Dean of Student Life about it. The RA and Head Resident Assistant were apparently alerted that the comment that was written on or near the door of a student.  The comment was taken down within four to five hours after being written. Campus Safety has been unable to identify who wrote this comment, because apparently their cameras don’t face the correct way to be able to identify the person. I have a … Read more

Watching Aversive Racism

Where I am from, there is not much diversity.  That was really highlighted for me while I was home this past weekend.  One of the most popular places in my hometown is a bagel shop.  Everyone goes to it and I often find myself running into old friends there both serving food and getting food.  In the summer, the local swim team has a tradition of going there after every practice (a tradition that I was part of establishing), so I have a lot of fond memories of the shop.  So, being sick of Pennsylvania ‘bagels’, I was excited to … Read more

Drawing the Line

Published by an Anonymous Student This week, I learned that my hometown debuted a painted blue line in the middle of the road in front of our municipal building, which houses the library, government offices, police department, and other administrative offices. Multiple government officials posted about it on their official Facebook pages, including pictures like this one from our Committeeman. They presented their action as a tribute to fallen law enforcement officers. Under the Facebook post, there were tens of comments praising the efforts of law enforcement and the symbolic recognition of the sacrifice made by police officers and other … Read more

Trump-isms: What’s Next?

I write this on November 2nd, less than a week before the presidential election. I choose to write this now for multiple reasons: 1) it’s becoming pretty clear who the next POTUS will be, and 2) I’m honestly afraid of what the consequences will be. This evening in my Facebook Newsfeed, towards the bottom of the trending bar, was the label “Black Church Burned” (The Atlantic, 2016). Immediately I felt my stomach sink, and when I clicked on the link to learn more, I came across an Atlantic article that explained a Black church in Mississippi was devastatingly burned and … Read more

Caffeine and a Call for Unity

I’ll admit it. I’m a coffee addict. It’s gotten to the point where I cannot make it through the morning without a headache if I don’t have my coffee. I got a Keurig machine for my birthday and cried. I know it’s bad, but when it comes to drugs of choice, I could be worse off. On rare occasions I will treat myself to the capitalist franchise of Starbucks. Something about their coffee gives me a jolt while also feeding into my inner “basic white girl.” I’m not going to go into the racial politics of fair trade coffee or … Read more