Do Expectations Affect Athletes’ Performance?

Someone who plays a sport and his constantly toted as the star player on their team always tends to perform at a higher level than the other players on the team.  This is probably largely due to talent, but I feel as though being told “we’re counting on you” and “you are our best player” can create a self – fulfilling prophecy with that person, helping them perform better.  If that player were to go play on a different team with completely different players who didn’t necessarily see them in the same light as their previous teammates, wouldn’t that player … Read more

An Attack on Richard Sherman

I enjoy watching football every once in a while, especially when my favorite team – the Giants – is not sucking.  Even though they weren’t playing the Super Bowl this year, I watched a little bit of the game and saw when the Seahawks won.  I missed the very short interview that Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman had with Erin Andrews (a Fox News sports reporter), though, which was also apparently very news-worthy.  Although the clip was extremely short, a frenzy erupted from it.  Andrews asked Sherman, moments after he blocked the 49ers from scoring a touchdown (which helped his team … Read more

On Being a Black Olympian

The Washington Post came out with a tongue-and-cheek article this past week on the complete and utter lack of racial diversity at the Olympics. The article tells the story of a black Olympic intern who was greeted in Sochi by a group of police officers who wanted to take their picture with him based on a fascination with seeing a black person in the flesh. Something else I learned from this article was that the first black Olympian to win a medal at the winter Olympics happened as recently as 2002, followed by Shani Davis winning the first male, African-american … Read more

Richard Sherman Interview

  I had brought this issue up in my journal entry and thought that it would be a topic that maybe some would like to discuss.  Some of you may be familiar with Richard Sherman’s interview with Erin Andrews after a NFL playoff game a few weeks ago.  Sherman came off as very egotistical and arrogant to the public because of the words and tone that he chose to use.  All forms of the media blew up with different responses.  The most intriguing responses to this interview, and the most relatable to our class, were found on twitter by several … Read more

Racism Isn’t Just Black & White

Jeremy Lin has been in the headlines for his basketball skills, but a lot of people have taken interest in another aspect of his identity, his race. Lin is one of the first famous Asian American NBA players, and the media can’t seem to get enough of him. From ESPN to Twitter, Linsanity has taken over. Recently, there has been controversy over ESPN’s repeated usage of the phrase “chink in the armor,” especially as a headline on their website referring to a recent Knicks’ upset below a picture of Lin. See image here: http://www.sbnation.com/nba/2012/2/18/2807696/espn-chink-in-the-armor-headline-jeremy-lin. For the purpose of this post, I will be discussing the picture in the link above and this video of a news anchor using the phrase again: http://www.forbes.com/sites/gregorymcneal/2012/02/18/espn-uses-chink-in-the-armor-line-twice-did-linsanity-just-go-racist/ ESPN has since removed the headline and reprimanded the people involved, but unfortunately, thanks to technology these images will live on in internet infamy.

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The Impact of “Positive” Stereotyping on White Social Identity Motivation

As you watch this video, notice that every player featured in this top ten dunks of all time video is black.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOViQaWZ69E

(Now, before I make anymore statements I have to disclaim that this is in no way, shape, or form, anything close to a “reverse racism” blog.) In fact, according to the 2005 census, the National Basketball Association and the National Football League, the professional representations of the two more athletically focused of the “big three” American sports (the third being baseball), were made up of 76% black players and 67% black players respectively.

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