Jul 072014
 

Originally published March 17, 2014 The recent literature in social psychology and other disciplines is clear: colorblind racial ideology is a harmful way of viewing the world. By ignoring both the material disadvantages faced by people of color and the implicit racial biases that influence decision-making, subscribing to colorblind racial ideology leads people to ignore the realities of racism in modern America and thus oppose policies that would address racial inequalities. In a recent class, we discussed how some white people who subscribe to such an ideology will go to any length to avoid mentioning a person of color’s race. This avoidance occurs despite the fact that, in all likelihood, this person is thinking about the person of color’s race. Research has shown that people who practice this kind of avoidance are perceived by many people of color as more racially biased. The solution to colorblindness, then, is color-consciousness, which …click to read full post

Jul 072014
 

Originally posted February 24, 2014   While stumbling around the internet this week I came across two articles that made me stop and think, this can’t be real. http://jezebel.com/last-night-on-jeopardy-no-one-wanted-to-answer-qs-about-1525439303 The first one that I came across was about Jeopardy, which on the night of 02/17, had a category called “African-American History.” The panelist were all white college students and they avoided the topic to the best of their ability. Reading the comments under the article, to which they are all mostly twitter posts, I was so confused. They have to teach something other than how important Martin Luther King is to Black History, but then I realized, growing up I myself I barely knew what it really was…and I’m black. I realized that between my European parents and my predominately white schooling there was no room for me to learn the importance of understanding what it meant to be African-American …click to read full post

Apr 142014
 

I recently read some news that made me think a little more critically about authority. On the Highlands Today newspaper website they said that as of this week the officers of Lake Placid Florida would began to wear camera’s attached to their uniforms to video record their interactions with civilians on duty. This means that their patrolling, arrest, and other things that they do on their daily rounds will be recorded and under review! This initially made me happy. It made me think of the countless amounts of times where police violence was used specifically on Black people. And then how those cops got a slap on the wrist and/ or got off in court because of “not enough evidence” or some other excuse that was used to hide the system’s main purpose of solidifying the white supremacist mindset it was founded on. But then I thought about it a …click to read full post

Apr 072014
 

Last week, our class discussed mass incarceration, the system by which a vastly disproportionate amount of people of color are imprisoned for the use or distribution of illegal drugs. The situation is quite bleak; the system has been escalating for the past few decades and has wreaked havoc among communities of lower class people of color. Nevertheless, there may in fact be a ray of light at the end of the tunnel. Throughout the country, some states are decriminalizing, and two are even legalizing, marijuana. Somewhat differently, in my home state, New York, Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo recently announced a plan to provide college classes to inmates in New York prisons. The idea is that the education these inmates receive will help them get jobs when they leave prison, reducing the likelihood that they will return. One aspect of the mass incarceration system involves the frequent rate of return to …click to read full post

Apr 072014
 

Recently I was on imgfav and saw a picture that was asking why doing something like calling a white person worthless is mean, but saying it to a black person is racism. I think people forget that racism is about power. It is about a majority oppressing a minority. It’s hard to remember sometimes because it’s easier to see oppression than privilege. This is why people who try to fight racism often end up in the trap of doing it to “help the poor minority”. Its hard to accept that you have privilege, that you are gaining something from the oppression of others. Part of privilege is being able to step away from the fight when it gets too hard or overwhelming. To be able to step away and forget about it for a while. That is privilege. Black people can’t ignore racism. The best, and most sustainable way to …click to read full post

 Posted by on 04/07/14